Faq - Milton Keynes Guitar Tuition

Space isn’t a problem here at Milton Keynes Guitar Tuition, there’s more than enough room for two people. Hand sensitiser is available and masks are advisory for customers. This isn’t a place of retail, but the procedures are still in place as if it were.

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If you’re having a half an hour lesson, then 20 minutes most days, if an hour than 40 minutes, if you can do more great! The more practice you put in the more progress you’ll make.

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The best age is about 7. Can they concentrate for half an hour? If so then feel free to book an introductory lesson and let’s get started, see you soon!

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All Along The Watchtower (Dylan, Hendrix, others)

Knockin’ on Heaven’s Door (Bob Dylan, others)

Wagon Wheel (Old Crow Medicine Show)

Low (Cracker)

What I Got (Sublime)

Creep (Radiohead)

You Can’t Always Get What You Want (Rolling Stones)

Sweet Home Alabama

The Blues

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You can learn guitar in Milton Keynes with Milton Keynes Guitar Tuition or otherwise known MK Guitar Tuition. Based in Manhatten House, it’s centrally located within walking distance to Sainsburys, MK Central train station and the main shopping centre.

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Both are a great option, currently due to Covid 19 I offer one lesson a month in person and the rest online. It’s a great routine and it means that you’re not going to spend much time traveling and more time learning.

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Consistency is better than quantity. 20 minutes to half hour every day is better than 10 minutes ever other day. Have a routine. Challenge your self, Practice blind folded. Ask questions, watch videos and have a go. Warm up with scaled, practice your chord changes with a metronome (there’s one on google), video yourself week in week out.

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It is as hard at the beginning as anything else, and to be honest it’s probably easier than most things.

When you first start learning, you’ll encounter the following issues:

  • Blisters on the fingertips from pressing down on the strings.
  • Wrist ache from new positions and posture which your hand isn’t used to.
  • You’ll discover patience.

Finger blisters will heal and toughen up after a few days.

Any instrument requires dedication. Remembering what you’re expected to practice is half of the battle. Learn slowly and accurately and don’t be in a rush, you’ll discover patience and determination.

The process for learning as an experienced player compared with a novices is actually the same, It’s the speed and knowledge which is different which either helps to speed things up or slow things down.

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Most parents are understandably more reluctant to buy expensive instruments for their child because they’re afraid that they’re going to give up sooner rather than later.

My advice is to assess where the interest of learning has come from. If you know they’re naturally into playing music which include guitars, and you know it’s an electric guitar which they’re super keen on, then the answer is obvious.

Parental influence is a huge motivator for learning to play. Playing music around your house all the time effects their tastes and what they’ll probably want to learn. Although parental influence and motivation helps, it’s important to remember that they are the ones that have to be interested. If you’re interested in learning the guitar, let’s get started.

If it’s clear that you or your child are interested in the electric, then buy an electric. If you’re unsure what style it is but they’ve expressed an interest in learning, buy an acoustic or classical then as a reward purchase their first electric guitar.

The skills are transferable, so which ever way round you choose, it’s not going to be a waste..

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Visit a guitar which has great customer service. You can visit The Music Centre, in Bedford, PMT Northamton, Coda in Stevenage for example.  A lot of guitar stores rely on those that are just starting out as well as catering for the more experienced players. Understand the genre which you want to be able to play and try to go for a guitar that will suit that style. As a beginner your primary task is to accomplish the basics and in my opinion a classical guitar is the way forward. Once you’ve learnt these, you can then deviate and buy a guitar which is more suited to your style. However, having said this if you know electric guitar is the way forward, then buy all means purchase one, but also accept it won’t be the last one you buy as you’ll discover what you like and don’t like about it.

An alternative to classical guitars, could be acoustic guitars. The difference is the style and the way you play them as well as the sound it produces. The advantage is that you do not need to buy a practice amp to practice. All skills are transferable so it’s not a problem if learning the electric guitar is the way you want to go.

I’m happy to help you purchase your first guitar and even your second one.

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The first thing I would do is decide what kind of style of guitar you want to learn. This is important, because you want to know what kind of guitar you want to learn on.
All styles of music use different guitars. Although there’s nothing wrong with playing heavy metal on a classical nylon string guitar it would make sense to have an electric with a rock guitar amp. Is it pop, rock, country or jazz? If so, then you’ll probably want to use an electric guitar or acoustic steel string guitar with a pick depending on what bands you like and which sound you like better. If you like classical, flamenco or folk music you might want to get an acoustic nylon string guitar and learn to play with your fingers on the plucking hand. Remember, these are just guidelines! There’s plenty of acoustic pop rock country and jazz out there too.

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